• Atsushi Mimuro shadowAtsushi Mimuro - Aikikai AikidoAikikai Aikido London logo shadow
    Fun fact: Our logo was designed to represent the multiple opponent nature of Aikido. The five petals of the cherry tree blossom resemble five Aikidokas in hakama attacking the centre. Aikido is based on circular movements, hence the circle connecting the petals!

    "Kicking leaves you momentarily on one foot,
    and for that moment you are in a very weak position.
    If you were to be swept off your feet, you would be finished.
    This is why lifting your feet off the ground is crazy."
    Morihei Ueshiba

    SELF-DEFENSE
    REAL
    Aikido was designed to deal with both
    unarmed or armed opponents
    involving frozen joint locks.
    LEARN MORE
    Fun fact: The founder Morihei Ueshiba was greatly influenced by his background with Daito Ryu school of Jujutsu. Therefore all aikido techniques work the same way whether or not the opponent is armed or unarmed. This makes Aikido a simple and effective style to learn and use if you ever need it.
    Fun fact: Appearances can be deceiving. Watching Aikido demonstrations may give you the impression that it works because the uke (the opponent) cooperates. A good uke is always ready to attack multiple times. Although executing an ukemi (mostly seen by rolling or falling and then rolling) is actually done by the uke to protect oneself from harm. Also, ukemi creates distance to prevent the other attacking and to create an opening for another attack. Although it seems the uke cooperates it cannot be farther from the truth. Give it a try and you will understand what we are on about!
    BALANCE
    CONTROL
    Fun fact: In Aikido "Ai" means connection. This is a basic principle of Aikido. We connect with our opponent and take control. By joining our opponent's movement, it requires very little effort to take control and break our opponents balance. As you can see here, if the uke (the guy holding the knife) isn't careful he may cut himself with his own knife! For him, his balance is broken and the other Aikidoka - in this case, Karesz - can create opportunities for any kind of finishing technique. Although, this situation is just perfect for a kotegaeshi!
  • Atsushi Mimuro shadowAtsushi Mimuro - Aikikai AikidoAikikai Aikido London logo shadow
    Fun fact: Our logo was designed to represent the multiple opponent nature of Aikido. The five petals of the cherry tree blossom resemble five Aikidokas in hakama attacking the centre. Aikido is based on circular movements, hence the circle connecting the petals!

    "Kicking leaves you momentarily on one foot,
    and for that moment you are in a very weak position.
    If you were to be swept off your feet, you would be finished.
    This is why lifting your feet off the ground is crazy."
    Morihei Ueshiba

    SELF-DEFENSE
    REAL

    Aikido was designed to deal with both
    unarmed or armed opponents
    involving frozen joint locks.

    LEARN MORE
    Fun fact: The founder Morihei Ueshiba was greatly influenced by his background with Daito Ryu school of Jujutsu. Therefore all aikido techniques work the same way whether or not the opponent is armed or unarmed. This makes Aikido a simple and effective style to learn and use if you ever need it.
    Fun fact: Appearances can be deceiving. Watching Aikido demonstrations may give you the impression that it works because the uke (the opponent) cooperates. A good uke is always ready to attack multiple times. Although executing an ukemi (mostly seen by rolling or falling and then rolling) is actually done by the uke to protect oneself from harm. Also, ukemi creates distance to prevent the other attacking and to create an opening for another attack. Although it seems the uke cooperates it cannot be farther from the truth. Give it a try and you will understand what we are on about!
    BALANCE
    CONTROL
    Fun fact: In Aikido "Ai" means connection. This is a basic principle of Aikido. We connect with our opponent and take control. By joining our opponent's movement, it requires very little effort to take control and break our opponents balance. As you can see here, if the uke (the guy holding the knife) isn't careful he may cut himself with his own knife! For him, his balance is broken and the other Aikidoka - in this case, Karesz - can create opportunities for any kind of finishing technique.  Although, this situation is just perfect for a kotegaeshi!
  • Atsushi Mimuro shadowAtsushi Mimuro - Aikikai AikidoAikikai Aikido London logo shadow
    Fun fact: Our logo was designed to represent the multiple opponent nature of Aikido. The five petals of the cherry tree blossom resemble five Aikidokas in hakama attacking the centre. Aikido is based on circular movements, hence the circle connecting the petals!

    "Kicking leaves you momentarily on one foot,
    and for that moment you are in a very weak position.
    If you were to be swept off your feet, you would be finished.
    This is why lifting your feet off the ground is crazy."
    Morihei Ueshiba

    SELF-DEFENSE
    REAL

    Aikido was designed to deal with both
    unarmed or armed opponents
    involving frozen joint locks.

    LEARN MORE
    Fun fact: The founder Morihei Ueshiba was greatly influenced by his background with Daito Ryu school of Jujutsu. Therefore all aikido techniques work the same way whether or not the opponent is armed or unarmed. This makes Aikido a simple and effective style to learn and use if you ever need it.
    Fun fact: Appearances can be deceiving. Watching Aikido demonstrations may give you the impression that it works because the uke (the opponent) cooperates. A good uke is always ready to attack multiple times. Although executing an ukemi (mostly seen by rolling or falling and then rolling) is actually done by the uke to protect oneself from harm. Also, ukemi creates distance to prevent the other attacking and to create an opening for another attack. Although it seems the uke cooperates it cannot be farther from the truth. Give it a try and you will understand what we are on about!
    BALANCE
    CONTROL
    Fun fact: In Aikido "Ai" means connection. This is a basic principle of Aikido. We connect with our opponent and take control. By joining our opponent's movement, it requires very little effort to take control and break our opponents balance. As you can see here, if the uke (the guy holding the knife) isn't careful he may cut himself with his own knife! For him, his balance is broken and the other Aikidoka - in this case, Karesz - can create opportunities for any kind of finishing technique. Although, this situation is just perfect for a kotegaeshi!

Aikikai Aikido London dojo in Wimbledon since 2006

Interview with Karesz Hoffer

How did you get involved with Aikido?

My generation had an inevitable influence from the martial art movies from the 80s and 90s. I’m pretty sure that a lot of people got very keen on learning something that comes from a different world. We are talking about the pre-internet era when information was hard to get. You couldn’t just Google or YouTube something you wanted information about. I was surely one of them. I only found out in my first class that Aikido is something that Steven Seagal practices as well. Martial art was something special, something hard to master.

Karesz Hoffer - Aikikai Aikido
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1092

Classes

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25

Grading and more to come

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712

Followers

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44

Attended seminars

Why not try?
Come along and give it a go!
You will be surprised how much fun this is!

Our Masters

Karesz Hoffer - Aikikai Aikido

Karesz Hoffer

Founder | 3rd Dan
Atsushi Mimuro - Aikikai Aikido

Atsushi Mimuro

Technical leader | 7th Dan
Szabolcs Madarasz - Aikikai Aikido

Szabolcs Madarasz

Shodan

Aikikai Aikido London is affiliated to Yokohama International Aikido, Japan

Sensei Atsushi Mimuro

Biography facts:

Atsushi Mimuro

Where did Aikido come from?

Founder Morihei Ueshiba

Morihei Ueshiba founded a martial art we know as Aikido, (known as O’Sensei), born in Tanabe on 14th December 1883. Around 1930, he formulated

this new art after an intense study of several other martial arts most notably Daito Ryu Jujutsu, under Sokaku Takeda.

His first teacher was Takisaburo Tozawa of the Kito school of Jujutsu. In 1903 Ueshiba Sensei entered the army and fought in the Russo-Japanese war.

He was well known for his fortitude and fighting spirit. He was only 5 feet 2 inches but weighed 180lb. In 1908, at the age of 25, he received a certificate from the Yagyu sword school. This was after studying with Master Masakatsu Nakai.

Morihei Ueshiba

What is Aikido?

Doshu Moriteru Ueshiba

All over the world people used to fight with sword, spears and other weapons. When they had no weapons at hand, they boxed or wrestled. These techniques of fighting were almost the same all over the world until the invention of guns. The use of guns for fighting completely changed the way wars was fought.

The Portuguese imported guns into Japan in 1543. The Japanese quickly started to make guns for themselves. Around 1590 guns were being used for fighting in wars and were proving to be more efficient than traditional weapons. The use of guns was still limited because of limited fabrication.

Moriteru Ueshiba

Photo gallery

How to behave in a Dojo?

Dojo Etiquette

Aikido – and other martial arts as well – is not all about learning techniques. It requires discipline and respect to yourself and others. Following an etiquette in the dojo is not only nice to for others but for your own benefit too. Many people do confuse religion with martial arts etiquette, However bowing when entering the dojo has got nothing to do with worshipping but only to show respect. The Etiquette in a dojo might seem a little serious but please bear in mind that in a Dojo you practice a Martial Art. Following the Etiquette you will not only show respect to your instructor but to others and yourself as well, by making their and your practice as focused and safe as possible.

Dojo etiquette
It is time to take action!

Classes and prices

Class times: Monday & Thursday 19:00 – 20:15

Kids class: Sunday 11:00 – 12:00

Single session

£ 15 /session
  • Maximum 3 times
Sign Me Up

Basic

£ 45 pcm
  • 1 session per week
Sign Me Up

Advanced

£ 65 pcm
  • 2 sessions per week
Sign Me Up

Kids

£ 40 pcm
  • 1 session per week
Sign up

What do our students say about us?

  • If you ever wondered what Aikido is about and how you could find out more about it - this is the place to be. The friendly atmosphere, the intensity of training and level of teaching is second to none. Highly recommended!

    Famil Ismailov – London UK, 2017
  • I started Aikido in Germany in October 2014. In September 2015 I joined this club and since then, I enjoyed every lesson. It's a well-balanced group of beginners and advanced Aikidoka of all ages. The atmosphere is friendly and when I came in for the first time, I felt welcomed by everyone. Karesz-sensei (teacher), just like everyone else, is happy to help. I definitely recommend to anyone to be curious and come along!

    Jennifer Sauer – London UK, 2017
  • After 15+ years of Aikido practice in France within the FFAB (led by the late Tamura Sensei), I found a very energising dojo at the Aikikai Aikido London- Wimbledon: an open mindset as well as an excellent mix of classical curriculum (for the technics themselves) and pragmatic approach to any situation. It is a lot of fun for beginners and for more advanced practitioners. Following Mimuro Sensei is also a great way to learn and provides a direct connection with the Hombu dojo (the Aikido headquarter in Japan).

    Stanislas Faure – London UK. 2017
  • I have joined the dojo as I wanted to start regular exercise but lacked the motivation to consistently go to the gym on my own. I was quickly proven right to do so! Everybody gave me a warm welcome and continued to encourage and support me when I was losing my will to keep going.The workout is full of flow and every person can adjust their pace to own ability. In the beginning, I was not super-fit and dreaded exercise. Now I attend twice a week and look forward to classes!On top of that, learning more and more about the philosophy of Aikido has subtly affected my attitude to life in a positive way!

    Eva Pav – LONDON UK, 2017
  • Since beginning Aikido in April 2016, it benefits have been positively permeating every aspect of my life. Whether it be professionally or personally I am more inclined to respond to conflict with a peaceful and creative response and to go with the flow where before I might have been more resistant resulting in deepening aggravation. As a martial art, it is beautiful, graceful and also very effective; Strengthening and harmonising the mind, body and spirit. Our friendly and supportive club has a fine array of advanced practitioners lead by our Sensei, Karesz. Karesz is enthusiastic about his art form and his very motivated to bring out the best in his students. His mantra is that we are there to have fun! And we do!

    Arjun Thandi – LONDON UK, 2017
  • Before deciding to commit to this dojo I was in the midst of exploring aikido and Wing Chun. I had tried out three other dojos. One other aikido dojo and the two others were Wing Chun. The aikido dojo was too competitive amongst the students which in short lead to a back injury. With the Wing Chun classes, I realised it was not exactly what I was seeking. Plus one sifu had an attitude of expecting you to join, pay and come back and the other almost seemed like he was pretending to be someone he is not. This dojo made an impression on me, found myself even after the first class to be thinking of and processing, which I never experienced with the other three places. My mind was always blank, could not recall anything.If it feels right, then the chances are, it is.

    Serkan Ayguner – LONDON UK, 2017
  • Karesz has been a great inspiration for me since day one I met him. I started learning Aikido from him when he opened his dojo in London. Since then I am a black belt Aikidoka and I have a lot to thank him as well for that. If you are looking for a great sensei and mentor look no further, with Karesz you will get one of the best you can get in London!

    JANOS MOLNAR – LONDON UK, 2016

Find us!

 The Broadway Court, SW19 1RG